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Behind The Welding Torch: Associations, Institutes, and Societies

Aside from those welders that work tirelessly to hone their craft and share their knowledge with others, there are many welding associations, institutes, and societies that have contributed to the field of welding in many ways. Some have even set certain standards for the welding world. Below are three of these organizations that actively educate welders, engage the welding community, and promote good welding practices.

 

American Welding Society

imageThe American Welding Society is the most respected organization in the welding field. This non-profit set the standards for welding specifications such as inspection, welding symbols, and different methods of welding.

American Welding Society has its roots in World War I. As the US grew industrially, so did the need for concrete information and standards for the welding industry. At the time, the American Welding Society was two separate organizations: The Welding Committee of the Emergency Fleet Corporation and The National Welding Council. It was not until industry leaders agreed upon the need for better welding information that the organizations merged to become the American Welding Society.

Welders are encouraged to become members of the American Welding Society. Whether you’re an individual, student, or corporation, membership gets you full access to industry news and trends as they break, discounts on events and publications, access to their health insurance program, and more.

To promote welding, the American Welding Society offers scholarships for students to pursue the trade. Those scholarships are awarded based on the student’s need and on their academic standing.

Certification through the American Welding Society earns welders more credibility in their field. The process requires that welders have thorough knowledge in areas such as basic welding practices, welding terms and symbols, and safety procedures. American Welding Society offers certification for welders as well as engineers, inspectors, and more.

Find out more about the American Welding Society

 

Welding Information Centerimage

The name says it all. Looking for the latest articles on welding safety? How about publications on the history of welding? The Welding Information Center collects resources from all over to answer various questions of the welding field. While this website is resourceful for welders, the information collected is also easy enough for non-welders to read and understand. The main focus of the Welding Information Center is to help the general public be more knowledgeable about welding and understand its importance to the society.

Find out more about the Welding Information Center

 

TWI – World Centre for Materials Joining Technology

image TWI is the international  version of the American Welding Society. UK-based TWI has offices all over the world. They offer information on training, news, jobs, and more. Their membership, however, is only open to corporations. Corporations gain much from memberships, such as access to core research, consultancy, and help with technical matters.

Their Mission?

“To deliver world-class services in joining materials, engineering and allied technologies to meet the needs of a global membership and its associated community.”

Their Values?

Include:

  • Independence
  • Innovation
  • Professionalism and Integrity
  • and Technology

Find out more about TWI

Do you have a membership to any of the above organizations, or have you used the Welding Information Center to better understand welding? What has your experience been? Would you recommend membership to others?

The post Behind The Welding Torch: Associations, Institutes, and Societies appeared first on Weld My World.

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